EFF’s Class Action Lawsuit Against AT&T for Collaboration with Illegal Domestic Spying Program

How far does the US government’s warrantless surveillance of Americans’ home and communications go? Had warrantless searches been committed on the communications of people where there was no probable cause, they are just slaps in the face of the 4th Amendment.

http://www.eff.org/legal/cases/att/
EFF’s Class-Action Lawsuit Against AT&T for Collaboration with Illegal Domestic Spying Program

* FAQ
* Summary of Key News Reports
* Legal Documents
* Related Links

The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) filed a class-action lawsuit against AT&T on January 31, 2006, accusing the telecom giant of violating the law and the privacy of its customers by collaborating with the National Security Agency (NSA) in its massive and illegal program to wiretap and data-mine Americans’ communications.

In December of 2005, the press revealed that the government had instituted a comprehensive and warrantless electronic surveillance program that ignored the careful safeguards set forth by Congress. This surveillance program, purportedly authorized by the President at least as early as 2001 and primarily undertaken by the NSA, intercepts and analyzes the communications of millions of ordinary Americans.

In the largest “fishing expedition” ever devised, the NSA uses powerful computers to “data-mine” the contents of these Internet and telephone communications for suspicious names, numbers, and words, and to analyze traffic data indicating who is calling and emailing whom in order to identify persons who may be “linked” to “suspicious activities,” suspected terrorists or other investigatory targets, whether directly or indirectly.

But the government did not act-and is not acting-alone. The government requires the collaboration of major telecommunications companies to implement its unprecedented and illegal domestic spying program.

AT&T Corp. (which was recently acquired by the new AT&T, Inc,. formerly known as SBC Communications) maintains domestic telecommunications facilities over which millions of Americans’ telephone and Internet communications pass every day. It also manages some of the largest databases in the world, containing records of most or all communications made through its myriad telecommunications services.

The lawsuits alleges that AT&T Corp. has opened its key telecommunications facilities and databases to direct access by the NSA and/or other government agencies, thereby disclosing to the government the contents of its customers’ communications as well as detailed communications records about millions of its customers, including the lawsuit’s class members.

The lawsuit also alleges that AT&T has given the government unfettered access to its over 300 terabyte “Daytona” database of caller information — one of the largest databases in the world. Moreover, by opening its network and databases to wholesale surveillance by the NSA, EFF alleges that AT&T has violated the privacy of its customers and the people they call and email, as well as broken longstanding communications privacy laws.

The lawsuit also alleges that AT&T continues to assist the government in its secret surveillance of millions of Americans. EFF, on behalf of a nationwide class of AT&T customers, is suing to stop this illegal conduct and hold AT&T responsible for its illegal collaboration in the government’s domestic spying program, which has violated the law and damaged the fundamental freedoms of the American public.
Legal Documents

* Complaint [PDF, 351KB]

Related Links

Related Pages on eff.org

* About the domestic spying program generally
* About FISA generally
* In re Sealed Case, Foreign Intelligence Court of Review, 2002 [PDF]
* EFF’s 2001 FISA FAQ

About AT&T’s Daytona Database (External)

* AT&T’s Daytona Page
* Another AT&T Daytona page
* “Survey: Biggest Databases Approach 30 Terabytes” eWeek.com
* “Bigger & Better” InformationWeek.com

Other NSA Domestic Spying Lawsuits

* American Civil Liberties Union
* Center for Constitutional Rights
* Electronic Privacy Information Center

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